Category: Food – camp delicacies…

Bush Tucker

I’ve been super busy drinking XXXX Gold beer and writing a collection of articles on bush tucker. I’ve only written about stuff I’ve actually eaten or experienced myself and will add more articles as my diet broadens and my palette’s sophistication grows. Check it out under Macho Divertissement -> Bush Tucker, Plants and Animals. Link is:

https://outbackjoe.com/macho-divertissement/bush-tucker-plants-and-animals/

dundee beach eating telescopium mud whelks

How to Make Apple Cider

Beer is too expensive. Everything is too expensive. We’re a single income family so I’ve been looking at ways to save. My solution – home made apple cider. I’ve been perfecting my method over the last few weeks and can now produce a reliable batch of apple cider every time. I thought an article may be useful to help others make ends meet and pay the bills.

https://outbackjoe.com/macho-divertissement/australian-places-and-general-travel/how-to-make-hard-apple-cider/

Lunch and Springvale Homestead

springvale homestead boab tree

Lunch today has yielded a new steak sandwich review dished up at the Katherine Country Club. After lunch we headed to Springvale Homestead – one of the oldest in tact buildings in the Northern Territory. Built and lived in by Alfred Giles. Initially I thought he was the famous explorer who undertook expeditions in central Australia. No that was Ernest Giles. Still Alfred was an important part of the early cattle industry in Australia, traversing the country several times south to north droving cattle and sheep, before settling at Springvale Homestead to work on the cattle station. He also did some of his own exploring.

The homestead is closed on weekends so we could not enter the building. There’s some information plaques on the outside that we could check out. During the week it’s a cafe and you can go inside.

It’s hard to imagine that during the 1998 Katherine floods the homestead was flooded to it’s ceiling. Quite unbelievable considering how low the river lies now, deep in the river valley below. In the photo you can just make out Sharni standing about halfway between the river and the homestead, with the tinned roof of the homestead visible in the background to the right of Sharni behind some trees.

There’s a big lone boab tree near the homestead. Not sure of it’s origins. Hard to pass a boab without taking a photo though. I checked for edible nuts, there were none to be found.

The weather is really heating up – 37 degrees today. The warm weather supposedly excites the barra into a feeding frenzy. Will have to put that to the test during the week some time I reckon. Also we’ve had too many fish free blog posts. Not a good trend.

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